Physical Geology – Deltas – Summary

>>Dr. Doug Elmore: This is the summary for deltas. Deltas are the end of the line. In this picture of the Mississippi River and Delta in Louisiana, you can see the Mississippi River coming down here past New Orleans just South of Lake Pontchartrain and out to the current Birdfoot Delta down here. Deltas are sights of deposition, or sights of progradation, where we add land. What happens is that sediment is being carried in the river when the river enters the ocean or when the water enters the ocean, it deposits sediment. Why? Well because the velocity slows down. […]

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The Lapworth Museum of Geology

welcome to the Lapras Museum of geology here at the University of Birmingham and what a fantastic and transformational year this has been for the museum given its grade ii listed status historical analysis of this fantastic building was really important the space was originally occupied in the Edwardian period and then during the First World War it became an ambulance station it was only the 1920 that it became the home to the network museum the last Werth has one of the UK's most scientifically important geological collections were ported a million objects we've used these unique collections in […]

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Stratigraphic Cross Section—Interpreting the Geology (Educational)

This hypothetical cross section represents a hundred million of years of sedimentation, tectonism, & volcanism. How did it form? First, to orient you, lets look at what is on the surface. This lake which has cut down through the surrounding sedimentary bedrock is near a volcanic dome that is surrounded by fallout deposits Now, let's remove the foreground in a giant fault to expose the cross section. In general, young rock layers overlie older rock layers. Gaps in the sequence, called unconformities are due to erosion, absence of deposition, or faulting. We start with a layer of undeformed bedrock on […]

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New England Aquifers, Part 1: Geology and Related Aquifers of New England

Good morning, good afternoon or good evening wherever you are located. The geology of New England can be very complex and the overview that I'm going to give is going to be primarily concentrated on its relation to groundwater. About 500 million years ago the continent of Pangaea was formed and what is important is that the North African plate collided with the North American plate. The first example of that are the Berkshires and the related deposits on the borders with New York and Connecticut and Vermont. What is most interesting is that we have limestone and marble deposits […]

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Michael Steinbacher: Catastrophist Geology | EU2014

Notes Toward an Electric Catastrophist Model for Geology Good afternoon! My talk is going to be based on the Venus section of Worlds in Collision. It's not really the words of Dr. Velikovsky but the survivors', that he quotes. And the description of the events that took place. The dates are not important. I'm comfortable with his dates. It doesn't really matter. It could be Nibiru, could be Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, but I'm comfortable with Venus as he thought. Let me get a different image there. The picture that's painted is dust, sand, gravel, rocks, very large boulders falling from […]

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Chiricahuas: Mountain Islands in the Desert

the following is a production of New Mexico State University from the award-winning nature series Southwest Horizons white sands of New Mexico the largest chips and dune fields of the world but they are more than just grains of sand venture to white sands white wilderness Episode one of Southwest Horizons it started 500 years ago when Columbus in search of Parton's gold and silk returned with new world treasures sea which spread around the globe forever changing civilizations and a human destiny today researchers are finding that the original genetic material from which these plants came are disappearing at […]

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Geology: Rock Formations and Units

Hi guys and welcome to Field Notes. Now when i first started learning geology one of the things that confused me the most was how you even begin to look at a hunk of rock and determine what happened to get it there how would you know that those cracks are not man made and how can you determine the line one rock starts and another rock ends? and what do you do when you have found it some of this comes from stratigraphic hierarchy or how we divide rocks into units it's much like how we divide plants and […]

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1. What is Geology?

[Music] Hello and welcome! This mini series is going to focus on basic concepts of geology and it's intended to help anyone in their studies of rocks and minerals. Before we take a deep dive into all things rocks, we need to learn what geology actually is. Geology is concerned with the Earth, the stuff it’s made out of, and how it changes over time. It’s an extremely important field in everything from developing sustainable forms of energy to understanding natural disasters. Coal mining and ore and petroleum extraction are among the economic applications of geology, while more environmental applications […]

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74) Field Geology Strategies

(Opening Music) Welcome back geology fans! Today we imagine you have completed your background investigations and gotten your gear together for your trip, and now you've touched down on your site of investigation. What should be your next steps and how should you conduct yourself to ensure safety and good data collection? There is no set list of steps to follow as each location may have to be approached in novel ways, but you should have your general strategy mapped out before arriving in the field. Be prepared. Your strategy may or may not involve some of the concepts we […]

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