Great Minds: James Hutton, Founder of Geology

When you look at a rock, what do you see? Most of us see it as a rock: gray, brown, perhaps some sparkle. Nothing interesting. But James Hutton, an 18th-century geologist, believed that rocks were not just rocks. Rather, it was the key to Earth’s history, billions of years old that transform and melt It is ground, twisted, and shaped again. It is a history he discovered at a time when most people believed the world was 6,000 years old James Hutton was born in Edinburgh, Scotland on June 3, 1726. He was a bit of a traveler, having studied […]

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Annoying Jun at the GEOLOGY MUSEUM

Rachel: Hey guys! Jun: Hey! Today we are in Ibaraki Prefecture, … and we'll go to some cool places. But we are to start with … in a geological museum. Okay, I have geology in my first year … as a major at university before I knew what I wanted to do. That's why I took 18 ECTS geology courses, … and I loved it. I love stones. Jun: It's huge. Rachel: They show you where they all came from. Look at the cobalt! Jun: Wow! Rachel: This is so pretty! A huge metamorphic rock! Jun: How do they do […]

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Physical Geology – Introduction: What are Rocks and the Rock Cycle?

>>In the last two videos we talked about minerals. Well, minerals, when they group together, form rocks and there are three types of rocks. Igneous rocks form from molten rock. Think of lava flowing out of a volcano on Hawaii. That's a good example of an igneous rock. A second type of rock is a sedimentary rock, which is composed of particles of rocks or minerals like sand grains on a beach or sand in a river. And then the third type of rock are metamorphic rocks, and these form by high heat, pressure, and chemical change. Now all of […]

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Module 1- Description of soil, Engineering Geology Of Soils and Thier Formation

welcome to the course geology and soil mechanics so basically today we'll be talking about the description of soil engineering geology of soils and their formation so first I will talk about the objective of this particular course the course prepares the students to be able to make effective learning of formation of soil and basic soil mechanics and the grading policy is like this so basically the home assignments will be having 40% to a tidge whereas the examination will be having 60% footage now this is the total course plan so in the week one the first week […]

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How a grain of sand rewrote our ocean’s history | Andrew Wheeler | TEDxDublin

Translator: Hiroko Kawano Reviewer: Cristina Bufi-Pöcksteiner This is our planet. This is planet Earth. What a curious name for a planet! I mean, there's very little earth on it. Only 29% of the surface of this planet is actually earth, land. (Laughter) We need to challenge our human-centric perspective of where we live. This is an oceanic planet. The oceans is where most of the life on this planet lives. The oceans control our weather. The oceans control our climate. When ocean circulation changes, the climate changes. The oceans are present absorbing excess CO2 and heat from our atmosphere. Yet, […]

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Physical Geology – Deltas – Summary

>>Dr. Doug Elmore: This is the summary for deltas. Deltas are the end of the line. In this picture of the Mississippi River and Delta in Louisiana, you can see the Mississippi River coming down here past New Orleans just South of Lake Pontchartrain and out to the current Birdfoot Delta down here. Deltas are sights of deposition, or sights of progradation, where we add land. What happens is that sediment is being carried in the river when the river enters the ocean or when the water enters the ocean, it deposits sediment. Why? Well because the velocity slows down. […]

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The Lapworth Museum of Geology

welcome to the Lapras Museum of geology here at the University of Birmingham and what a fantastic and transformational year this has been for the museum given its grade ii listed status historical analysis of this fantastic building was really important the space was originally occupied in the Edwardian period and then during the First World War it became an ambulance station it was only the 1920 that it became the home to the network museum the last Werth has one of the UK's most scientifically important geological collections were ported a million objects we've used these unique collections in […]

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Stratigraphic Cross Section—Interpreting the Geology (Educational)

This hypothetical cross section represents a hundred million of years of sedimentation, tectonism, & volcanism. How did it form? First, to orient you, lets look at what is on the surface. This lake which has cut down through the surrounding sedimentary bedrock is near a volcanic dome that is surrounded by fallout deposits Now, let's remove the foreground in a giant fault to expose the cross section. In general, young rock layers overlie older rock layers. Gaps in the sequence, called unconformities are due to erosion, absence of deposition, or faulting. We start with a layer of undeformed bedrock on […]

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New England Aquifers, Part 1: Geology and Related Aquifers of New England

Good morning, good afternoon or good evening wherever you are located. The geology of New England can be very complex and the overview that I'm going to give is going to be primarily concentrated on its relation to groundwater. About 500 million years ago the continent of Pangaea was formed and what is important is that the North African plate collided with the North American plate. The first example of that are the Berkshires and the related deposits on the borders with New York and Connecticut and Vermont. What is most interesting is that we have limestone and marble deposits […]

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Michael Steinbacher: Catastrophist Geology | EU2014

Notes Toward an Electric Catastrophist Model for Geology Good afternoon! My talk is going to be based on the Venus section of Worlds in Collision. It's not really the words of Dr. Velikovsky but the survivors', that he quotes. And the description of the events that took place. The dates are not important. I'm comfortable with his dates. It doesn't really matter. It could be Nibiru, could be Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, but I'm comfortable with Venus as he thought. Let me get a different image there. The picture that's painted is dust, sand, gravel, rocks, very large boulders falling from […]

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